The Arthur Erickson Foundation operates with a number of standing committees, including the Stewardship Council, which was created in 2016 specifically to address the challenges associated with ‘respectful stewardship’. The Stewardship Council is composed of architectural, landscape and urban planning professionals, and operates as a pro bono resource group, providing advice to building owners, owners’ consultants and relevant regulatory authorities on the care and sustainable management of Erickson buildings.

Resources available include general counsel and assistance with:

  • information-gathering on Erickson’s work, including bibliographical references and locations of archived material
  • proposals for maintenance, alterations and additions, new construction
  • development of guidelines and procedures for maintenance and new construction
  • selection of architectural, landscape, and other consultants, including, for example, advice on the preparation of appropriate Statements of Significance.

The Stewardship Council currently includes the following AEF Directors:

  • Phyllis Lambert CC GOQ CAL M Arch LLD FIRAC, Montreal
    • Chair, Stewardship Council; Founding Director Emeritus, Canadian Centre for Architecture
  • David Covo, Architect, OAQ FRAIC, Montreal
    • Vice-Chair, Stewardship Council; Associate Professor of Architecture, McGill University
  • Larry Beasley, C.M., Vancouver
    • 'Distinguished Practice' Professor of Planning, School of Community and Regional Planning, UBC
  • Christopher Erickson, B. Arch., Bowen Island
  • Don Luxton, Architect, AIBC FRAIC, Vancouver
  • Liz Watts, Landscape Architect, BCSLA, Vancouver

In addition, we are fortunate to be able to work on a regular basis with a number of Arthur Erickson’s former colleagues and collaborators whose experience and insight into design intentions have been instrumental in our discussions.

In the last two years, the Stewardship Council has developed a collegial and constructive working relationship with the University of British Columbia in relation to projects underway on two of Erickson’s major buildings: the transformation of UBC’s premises in Robson Square, and a major expansion and infrastructure renewal project at the Museum of Anthropology. Key players in these discussions have included, at UBC, senior personnel in Campus and Community Planning, Infrastructure Development, the Museum of Anthropology and UBC Robson Square, and at the Province of British Columbia, Shared Services (Robson Square) and Workplace Development Services. We continue to be consulted on both large and small-scale interventions in these ongoing projects.

We are committed to the stewardship of Arthur Erickson’s legacy. We understand the complexity of the challenge faced by the owners and managers of his buildings, and, at the same time, that informed decisions, based on archival research and consultation with experts on his work, are essential to the process. Even good buildings age, requiring not only careful maintenance but also transformation and expansion as the people and communities that they house continue to evolve.

Photo credit: David Covo